Monday, March 30, 2015

Video fodder -- NASA edition

If I get a chance, I may put together some short edits of these for Monday videos. In the meantime, serious space buffs can have some fun with these in their full-length glory.

TOWARD THE UNEXPLORED




HISTORY OF THE AIR FORCE 1954 - 1964 -- FROM MISSILE DEVELOPMENT TO SPACE




SPRINGBOARD TO SPACE -- THE ARNOLD CENTER STORY



Apollo Soyuz






Time of Apollo


Moonwalk One, ca. 1970







Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Monday, March 16, 2015

Monday Video -- Hero's steam engine

[Every Monday for the next few months, we'll be posting a short video clip here at You Do the Math. All will have at least a tenuous connection to science, technology, engineering, or mathematics. Teachers can use these as writing prompts or as starting points for larger lesson plans (I'll try to include some hints now and then), but the main purpose is simply to have a little fun.]


We will definitely need to revisit Hero of Alexandria.


Hero's steam engine




Monday, March 9, 2015

Monday Video -- trebuchet

[Every Monday for the next few months, we'll be posting a short video clip here at You Do the Math. All will have at least a tenuous connection to science, technology, engineering, or mathematics. Teachers can use these as writing prompts or as starting points for larger lesson plans (I'll try to include some hints now and then), but the main purpose is simply to have a little fun.]

Not crazy about the video but I love the technology and I can imagine a number of excellent lessons and class projects could use this as a starting point.

World record trebuchet at Warwick Castle.




Saturday, March 7, 2015

Still very much in the rough-draft stage...

...but I'm starting on a video series targeted at students who are trying to study for the SAT but are too far behind to get much out of the standard prep materials. You can check out the early efforts here.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Standardized test prep -- A circle and rhombus problem

[This is a repost but it seems to be a good fit with the test series we've been running.]

In an earlier post, we talked about "step-back problems." The idea is that, wherever possible, each problem should be associated with at least one problem that uses similar format and relies on similar concepts but which "steps up" (is more difficult) or "steps down" (is easier).

In that previous post we talked about problems where you had to find the shaded area of a circle. This problem covers similar territory but takes things up a notch.

Circle 1 and Circle 2 both have radius 2. Each passes through the center of the other. Find the area of the rhombus formed by the two points of intersection (A and B) and the centers of each circle (C1 and C2).







Solution after the break.